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Who was Bakenrenef?
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 6:48 am 
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Please tell me some info about him. Who was he? A pharaoh or a visier?
Help! Thanks!


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 7:14 am 
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I honestly don't know for sure but it seems that he was a vizier.

http://thetwolands-egypt.websiteanimal.com/lateperiod

Another site describes him as "Bakenrenef (also known by the Greek form of his name, Bocchoris) was a king of the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt. While Manetho considers him the sole member of the Twenty-fourth dynasty (frags. 64, 65), modern scholars include his father Tefnakhte in that dynasty. Also, while Sextus Julius Africanus quotes Manetho as stating that Bakenrenef ruled for six years, some modern scholars again differ and assign him a shorter reign." http://toshare.dynup.net/en/Bakenrenef.htm

And yet another site: "

Bakenrenef (also known by the Greek form of his name, Bocchoris) was a king of the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt. While Manetho considers him the sole member of the Twenty-fourth dynasty (frags. 64, 65), modern scholars include his father Tefnakhte in that dynasty. Also, while Sextus Julius Africanus quotes Manetho as stating that Bakenrenef ruled for six years, some modern scholars again differ and assign him a shorter reign.



Manetho is the source for two events from Bakenrenef's reign. The first is the story that a lamb uttered the prophecy that Egypt would be conquered by the Assyrians, a story later repeated by such classical authors as Claudius Aelianus (De Natura Animalis 12.3). The second was that Bakenrenef was captured by Shabaka, a king of the Twenty-fifth dynasty, who executed Bakenrenef by having him burned alive.



Diodorus Siculus, writing about three centuries after Manetho, adds some different details. Diodorus states that although Bakenrenef was "contemptible in appearance", he was wiser than his precessors (1.65). The Egyptians attributed to him a law concerning contracts, which provided for a way to discharge debts where no bond was signed, and was observed down to Diodorus' time (1.79). For this, and other acts, Diodorus included Bakenrenef as one of the six most important lawgivers of ancient Egypt.



Despite the importance implied by these writers, few contemporary records of Bakenrenef have survived. The chief inscription of his reign concerns the death and burial of an Apis bull; the remainder are a few stelae Auguste Mariette recovered while excavating the Serapeum in Saqqara." http://www.postalesa.com/articles/Bakenrenef


Sorry I couldn't be of more help. Hopefully someone a bit more knowledgable will come along.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:24 am 
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Yes, there were two men called Bakenrenef in ancient Egypt: a vizier and and a pharaoh.

The vizier Bakenrenef lived during Psammetik I's rule. His tomb in Saqquara is used for their children for hundreds of years. (300, I think).

The king... well, I probably don't know as much as Mary, but I'll write down what I found:

Tafnakht was in a status as a king. It seems he and Bakenrenef(also known as Bocchoris, as Mary said)were the 24. dynasty. Bakenrenef's baze was in Sais but everyone knew his name from the Delta to Herakleopolis (I'm not sure with the city's right English name, but...)
After Bakenrenef, Peye ruled. We don't know much about their relationships, but Peye was a 25. dynasty king so they weren't a father and son or something like that.
The Nubians wanted to get Egypt, so Peye's son (?)
Sabaka (716-702 BC) conquered the country in 716 BC. In that times, they made Egypt and Kus together, and they killed Sabaka, Sebitka, Taharka and Tanutamon - even if archeologists think he was a 25 dynasty king. Manetho says they killed Bakenrenef, too.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 7:15 pm 
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We had a discussion on another board about Bakenrenef and this may be of interest:

I did find that there is a statue of Bakenrenef (it's the one on the right). From what I read it's in Boston.

According to this site http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/admin ... ziers.html Bakenrenef was the Vizier of Northern Egypt. Hence the tomb at Saqqara?

There's page from the University of Pisa that shows a reconstruction of the tomb of Bakenrenef:
http://www.egittologia.unipi.it/pisaegypt/saqqara.htm

A (poor) translation using google:
Quote:
The great archaeological exploration of tomb (the rupestre one?) of the visir Bakenrenef (L 24) was begun in the 1974 from the Chair of Egyptology of the University of Pisa under the direction of Edda Bresciani. The jobs still continue, subsidize from a contribution of the Ministry Foreign policies you Italian, Office Cultural Relations. Situated to some hundred of meters to south-east of one of most famous monuments of the world, the pyramid (to gradoni) of Djozer Pharaoh of III the Dynasty (2617-2599 a.C.), the tomb is dug in falesia the north of Saqqara, that it faces the plain of Menfi. The owner of this monument is prince Bakenrenef, son of Padineit, and visir of Psammetico I, founding of XXVI saitica dynasty (664-624 to C). All the complex dug in the cliff, from the facade to the vestibolo, the long one knows it to pillars to knows it of the offered ones to the sanctuary placed side by side from the two small cells, had been originally covered of beautiful limestone blocks. The archaeological exploration undertaken to leave from 1974 had like scope the protection and the restoration of this monument therefore degraded and therefore important, nearly regale for its dimensions (measure 40 m of length and i its pools come down end beyond the 16 m. of depth) and for the original wealth of the decorations; the ipogeo is preceded from one short with the income flanked from the pylons; the court and the pylons have been discoveries from the pisana archaeological mission, but the pylons now are hidden under the asphalted road; sand and detritus cover the access and escarpment falesia to ipogee others tombe sottostanti.Dal time of the discovery from part of the Jumel French in 1820, the tomba have been admired from celebrate visitors of the slid century, like J. F. Champollion (the decoder of the geroglifici) and Ippolito Rosellini (father of the Italian Egittologia) when they guided their combined shipment, the franc-Tuscany Shipment in Egypt and Nubia between 1828 and 1829. Rosellini described the tomba in the its "most magnificent Newspaper" defining it "of the tombe of Saqqara"; in 1828 it had acquired to limestone Alexandria the sarcofago of Bakenrenef, and it carried it to Florence, where still it can be admired in the Archaeological Museum (Cat.1705/2182).


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 9:39 pm 
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720-664Love those Google translations. Is there a translation for the translation? :P

Anyway, I was the one on the other forum who asked for information on Bakenrenef the vizier, and Merytre-Hatshepsut provided that valuable information. We have sections of inscribed walls in our exhibit at the Field from the Saqqara tomb of the vizier, and judging from that bit of digital recreation the Italians have on their website, a spectacular tomb it must have been.

Bakenrenef was vizier to Pharaoh Psamtik I Wahibre (664-610 BCE), Dynasty 26. This was when the government ruled from Sais, I think. Pstamik's cartouches are seen on the wall sections we have at the Field (minus his pronomen), and other inscriptions there tell us that Bakenrenef was also a governor and sem-priest.

But for all we know pencilbox1 was inquiring about Bakenrenef the pharaoh, who reigned at the end of the 24th Dyansty, about 60 years before the vizier. Well, there was only one other pharaoh then (Tefnakht), and neither was what you'd call a significant ruler.

Frankly I know more about the vizier Bakenrenef than the pharaoh. Hey, Merytre-Hatshepsut, maybe Martin will give us a writeup on the vizier's tomb in his sequel-book to The Hidden Tombs of Memphis. Yeah, that's right, I'm still on that kick. I really wish he would write another book on Memphite tombs because there's so much more to tell! :D


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 2:25 am 
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Kmt_sesh! :D
Pisa is my Uni!...whatever...if you need translations, just ask! I'll be glad to help you out! :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 5:24 pm 
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Quote:
Pisa is my Uni!...whatever...if you need translations, just ask! I'll be glad to help you out!


Thanks so much for that offer, maatkara, but I think I got the gist of it from the link Merytre-Hatshepsut provided. I read it months ago when she first directed me to that web page in another forum.

I just get a chuckle out of how Google translated it. I mean, I don't speak or read Italian, but it's a beautiful language, and the Google translation rendered it into humorous gibberish. But it works well enough to make sense of it, and I suppose that's the point, right? :wink:


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