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Tut
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2002 6:15 pm 
Tomb Robber
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Im not dissing tut but what did he do that was great yeah we found his body but when i look up stuff on him it only talks about his body being found isnt that stupid u would think that since he ws famouse there would be more


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help me AKHENATEN pretty please please please yea you
PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2002 8:15 pm 
:idea: :idea: :idea: :( HEY HELP ME PLEASE.....HERE ARE MY QUESTIONS I NEED TO KNOW:

1. WHAT IS A "KA"? AND TELL ME HOW THEY PREPARED TUTS "KA" FOR THE AFTERLIFE

2. WHAT GODESSES OR GODS OR SPIRTS WILL BE PRESENT AT HIS BURIAL?

3. LISST MATERIAL ITEMS THAT WILL ACCOMPANY TUT ON HIS JOURNTY . EXPLAIN SIGNIF.

4. WHATS THE REAL REASON HE DIED?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2002 1:55 am 
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Tha KA is a form of the egyptian spirit, not like we understand the concept of a soul though. There were three parts: the Ka, the Ba and thre Akh (think I spelt that wrong but its something like that!). The ka was made at the same time as the physical body by the God Khnum, who constructed the body and the Ka on his wheel. The Ka continued to 'live' after the death of the mortal body and would return to it once the embalming procedures had been carried out to live on in the next life. It was imperative for the body to be preserved for this to happen. This is why they took all there food and possessions with them. They truly believed they could take it all with them.

Right the four gods, correct me if i'm wrong anyone but there were four godesses who surrounded the canopic shrine and chest of Tut, Isis, Nepthys, Neith and Selkis or Seshat, always get the two mix up. Will check on that. Also the burial chamber shows him being welcome into the next world by Hathor, who was known as the Lady of the West (Which was the land of the dead as far as egyptians were concern) Isis and Annubis. He is also showed being welcome by the goddess Nut who was usually represented on the underside of the sarcophagus protecting the body.


The next question would take far too long and that information can be found in any book on Tut.

Final question, it is speculated that he was murdered. There is eveidence of blows to his skull from a sharp object. His successor was Aye, a commonor and desparate to be Pharaoh. His widow, Ankhesuamun was driven to desperate measures. She wrote to the Hittite King asking him to send one of his sons to wed her. When this happened he was conveniently murdered at the egyptian border. I think by Horemheb who went on to become pharaoh after Aye. He was head of the army and had the power to give that sort of order. Ankhesuamun disapeared soon after her forced marriage to Aye and it is his first wife Tye who appears in his tomb with him. Was Ankhesuamun murdered also. I think so.


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re>>What do you have to do to be Pharaoh?
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2002 3:48 pm 
The position of King in Egypt entailed several major roles that the Egyptians expected to do as king (so much so that even women kings attempted to fufil them as best they could).

Firstly, the most traditional role which dated back to the archaic period was that of provider for the nation; the king was expected to regularly inspect the irrigation systems and granaries to ensure that the harvest came in. One of the oldest ceremonies was the opening of a new irrigation channel, which the king would perform dressed in his finaries. In this role also the king was expected to help initiate trade, bringing luxuary goods into the kingdom from far afield (even as early as Dynasty 1, the kings were sending expeditions into Kush, Sinai and the Red Sea for trade)

Secondly the King was the Protector of great strength (as depicted by the bull's tail and smiting scenes) and was expected to defend Egypt against the Nine Bows (the traditional enemies such as Mitanni, Libyans and the Nubians) and the military expected expeditions (raiding) at least once a year. The traditional focus was Kush and Nubia, for gold and the rarer goods, as well as the cities and kingdoms of the Levant. Egypt never really went for the Empire building on a scale of it's Assyrian neighbours - but it had "traditional" areas of dominance which the Pharaoh was expected to protect (Pharaoh's such as Akenaten neglected the Empire, leading to the instability and the eventual fall of the 18th Dynasty to the military).

Pharaoh was also High Priest of all the Temples of All the Gods (although the dynasty's local god often took pre-eminence), but appointed High-Priests to perform day-to-day business (the priesthood was more of a job than an expression of personal faith) of the Temple holdings; himself participating in the great festivals and responsible for the siting of new Temples. In with the religious side, was the concept that the strong pharaoh kept Ma'at (a concept similar to "the natural order of things/ justice/ truth/ harmony and chinese yin-yang") in the land. Pharaoh was also a living-god, thus he was the shepherd of his people and by helping the Pharaoh enter heaven, the peoples themselves hoped to swing the afterlife in their favour.

Pharaoh was also the top bureaucrat/judge and administrator, responsible for the appointment of all the other ministers and governors of the provinces (in theory), although some left this to the two viziers or the High Priests to do.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2002 3:58 pm 
[ His successor was Aye, a commonor and desparate to be Pharaoh. His widow, Ankhesuamun was driven to desperate measures.

Wrong, Aye was the Vizier, and since the death of Akhenaten, the effective ruler of Egypt, regent for the child Tutankhamun, who ordered the reinstatement of the Old gods and the return of the capital to Thebes and the most powerful, most widely respected and senior noble at court, a peer (possibly) to Amenhotep III and Grandfather to Tutankhamun's wife, whom he married to take the throne - dying shortly after of old age (I think he was in his 70s). Aye was no evil fool, Akenaten's experiment was bad for Egypt and the country was falling apart - the Nubians and Asians had pushed the borders of Egypt back, corruption was rife (Akenaten never left Aketaten once he moved there) and trade had dried up. (Although to the vast majority of Egyptians - Akenaten's reign was largely unfelt - the Temples may have closed, but people continued to worship the old gods - most added Aten (just in case) as shown by the tomb of Meryneith which shows dedications to Aten, and then to the old gods).

Once Akhenaten was dead and Nefertiti "disappeared", Aye was the only individual at court who had the authority in Egypt to restore the country together and became ruler in all but name; whilst the 8 year old Tutankhamun was allowed to enjoy his childhood in his palaces. However, being the son of the Heretic made the priests of Amun (the third power bloc of the nation) highly suspicious, thus it is probable that they with the generals of the army plotted against Tutankhamun and removed him before he could make any attempts at a return to the horrors of Amarna.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2002 12:47 am 
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NOT WRONG!

Like it or not AY was a commoner with a tenuous link to the royal family through his sister and daughters. This does not make him of royal blood and it was not seemly to boast of a link to the royal family through women. Anyone not of royal blood was considered a commoner.

Look at Tiye. She may have been Great Royal Wife but when Amenhotep III married her, he made it clear that she was a commoner by stating who her mother and FATHER were.

I know Ay was vizier, I know his role and I know what happened after the death of Tutankhamun. I know he had the power and strength to restore order, but he should have done that in support of his King. Which he seemed content to do until Tut decided to take things into his own hands at which point he was murdered.

Ay had no right to the throne. If Tut had live there is the possibility he would have had more heirs with Ankhesenamun or another wife or concubine.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2002 3:25 pm 
Whilst Aye was not of direct royal blood, his position in court was such as to be effective Pharaoh as his power was probably what allowed Akhenaten to indulge his fantasies; one certainly wouldn't have called him a commoner to his face nor in respectable society as he was chosen by the king, thus above a commoner, perhaps had it been in the Old Kingdom the issue of blood relatives would have been more important, but in the New Kingdom men of career and influence were not called commoners. I'm not sure, but I have a feeling he was granted a title something along the lines of King's Brother in Kush, which whilst not royal link - was a sign of great approval by the Pharaoh and carried significant weight.

Ay perhaps didn't have a "right" to take the throne, but he saw what a disaster the Aten project had been to Egypt's empire, economy and social stability, and thus he did what he felt was best for the country (as did the Priests of Amun, the bureaucracy and the military). If Ay had been so unrightful in taking the reigns of power and attempting to bring order back - he would have probably not lasted very long (well his reign would have been even briefer). Aye and the Egyptian court probably feared Tutankhamun, once left to his own devices would begin undoing the stabilising work of the Regency and pushing back towards Atenism. But Aye's reign was legitimate and recognised by the Egyptian establishment, although how they felt about his reign is largely unknown, and as the majority of Egyptians never actually saw the Pharaoh in person, they probably suspected nothing out of the ordinary.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2002 8:05 pm 
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If Aye was an important man he would have had a higher social status than the commoners, but not being royal, he would have been lower than those in the Pharaoh's family, so he would have been a Noble, right?

-Akhenaten-


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2002 1:15 am 
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Yes a noble. Yes he was a very important man, a very clever man, with a very high position at court. 2nd only to the pharaoh. No you wouldn't have called him a 'commoner' to his face but it doesn't change the facts.

Take a more modern example. The british royal family. The late queen mother, a very regal lady, but she was touted as the first 'commoner' to marry into the british royal family. Now she was of the highest nobility in the land. The daughter of an earl and countess yet she was still classed as a commoner because she was not of royal blood.

But lets stop singing the man's praises shall we! He was, in all likelihood, a murderer. No matter how many good things he did they don't cancel out that.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2002 8:17 am 
Most historical characters were murderers if you look at their lifetimes, so what difference does it make? They should be judged by all their actions - all Pharaohs had people put to death on their orders, as did most Greek kings, Roman Emperors, Mesopotamian monarchs etc.. Indeed the very hareems of the pharaohs had a high mortality rate as treachery and intrigue often depleted the number of royal children.

Aye on balance was a stabilising influence in the kingdom, a man wise to what made Egypt great and what kept it in that state of greatness, who whilst plotting and not entirely successful in his work (mainly due to his great age) did do much to restore Egypt after the Amarna period.


And on the point mentioned about it unseemly to claim royal status through marriage, the Pharaoh Userkaf and several other pharaohs during the middle and old kingdoms rose to the throne through their links via women.


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Re: help me AKHENATEN pretty please please please yea you
PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2002 9:07 pm 
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tuts wrote:
:idea: :idea: :idea: :( HEY HELP ME PLEASE.....HERE ARE MY QUESTIONS I NEED TO KNOW:

1. WHAT IS A "KA"? AND TELL ME HOW THEY PREPARED TUTS "KA" FOR THE AFTERLIFE

2. WHAT GODESSES OR GODS OR SPIRTS WILL BE PRESENT AT HIS BURIAL?

3. LISST MATERIAL ITEMS THAT WILL ACCOMPANY TUT ON HIS JOURNTY . EXPLAIN SIGNIF.

4. WHATS THE REAL REASON HE DIED?



Okay. Sorry, but I don't remember it saying "Please Help me Akhenaten" On your letter before, so I'm really sorry I didn't write before.

Here's what I know...

A Ka is the person's vital force. If you were royal and had a mortuary temple, people would go there and offer food and say prayers, which they belived would nourish the Ka.
The Ka was supposedly created at your birth, and it was known as "Joining one's Ka" at death. The Ka is linked to the physical body, so that's why it was vital that the deceased remains were intact after burial. This is also why they hade funerary masks. If the face of the mummy was destroyed and the Ka couldn't recognize it, then the mask would prove the identity. The hieroglyph used to write Ka is a pair of joined arms or a person's double, shown kinda like a shadow.

What gods or goddeses were present at the funeral?

Well, hired mourners mourned the deceased. The two chief mourners were identified with Isis and Nephthys, the sisters of Osiris. In tomb painting and books of the dead, Anubis is shown standing behind the mummy during funeral rites. This was all I could find on the subject.

Items buried with deceased and significance:

Well, they usually included as much funerary equipment as they could afford. This could include a mattress and headrest, chairs, tables, wine, boxes and chests, clothing, wigs, sandals, staffs of office (If they had one, otherwise a walking stick), bags, jewellery, boardgames, mirrors, and other simialr items. Stuff that they used in everyday life. And they were buried with equipment related to their profession, like a Scribe being buried with writing implements, or a soldier with his weapons.

In the Old Kingdom they were buried with a "reserve head, " or a statue of the deceased's head, in case the mummy was unrecognizeable. During the New Kingdom they were sometimes buried with an Osiris-shaped tray filled with silt and planted with grain, which germinated after the tomb was closed. This emphasized the role of Osiris as god of the dead and the sprouting of the grain meant the rebirth of the deceased into the Afterlife.

They were also buried with four "Magic Bircks" of unbaked mud. They were set one on each side of the tomb. each one had an amulet inside. West had a faience djed-pillar, East had an unfired clay figure of Anubis, South had a reed with a wick, which looked like a torch, and the one on the Northern wall contained a shabti (Which I will talk about in a minute). The bricks were inscribed in Hieroglyphics with the 151st chaper of the book of the dead.

Shabtis:

Shabtis were small mummiform figures called "Answerers." They were meant to come alive in the Afterlife and be servants for the deceased. They were buried by the hundreds in tombs, each usually inscribed with the name of the deceased.

On the mummy were placed Amulets, and each of them had a special significance.
They were buried with wadjyt or Horus eye amulets, heart amulets, ankh amulets (Ankh meant life), scarab amulets, amulets depicting gods, and many more. The Wadjyt eye was placed over the incision cut in the left side of the abdomen to remove the internal organs. Over the heart was placed a scarab beetle amulet. It was a symbol of a new life and a resurrection. It was wrapped in linen bandages and then placed over the heart and was usually greenj or another dark color.


How did Tutankhamen really die?

No one knows for certain. X-rays of the Pharaoh's scull show that he suffered a blow to the back of the head, so many people, including myself, think he was murdered. The two most likely suspects for this are Aye, Tutankhamen's Vizier and the next Pharaoh, and Horemheb, cheif of the army.

Hope this helps. For more information on how Tutankhamen could have died, read, "The Murder of Tutankahmen" by Bob Brier.

-Akhenaten-


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where???
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 5:37 am 
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Akhenaten where did u learn all that info??????? its like u know everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!! about everything :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
2 do with egypt that is


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 7:48 am 
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I bet a lot of the information lies in books.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 1:04 pm 
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Yeah, LOLZ. I've told a lot about the murder of Tut also. Look up in Search, put my name in one of the blanks, and look up "Tut" or something of that nature. ACK. The same question poppes up every couple days, LOLZ.


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I NEED HELP!! Q;"wut wuz so significant about king tut'
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2003 7:44 am 
:evil: Q:"wut wuz so significant about king tut's tomb?PLZ HELP!!!!!!!!" :?:


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