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The power behind the throne
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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2005 6:22 am 
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I also posted this on another board, but thought I would throw the info out here as well :D

It's not meant to be a complete list, just some families that jumped out at me.

Anneke


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There are several powerful families of nobles that arise in Ancient Egypt. During the eighteenth dynasty there are at least four such families.


The family of Senenmut (temp. Hatshepsut).
Senenmut was the owner of two tombs in thebes, TT71 and TT353. Senenmut was the son of Ramose and Hatnefert. Senenmut held the titles of Steward, Great Steward, Overseer of the Granary, and Overseer of the Royal Works.He is also known from several statues showing him with the royal princess Neferure.
His brother Senimen is depicted in TT71. Senimen was a Steward and Nurse of the God’s Wife. The God’s Wife here is the royal princess Neferure. Senimen was married to a lady called Senemiah. Senimen had his own tomb: TT252.
In Senenmut’s tomb there is mention of a third brother named Minhotep, who was a wab-priest.
This family’s power was closely linked to Hatshepsut, and their influence may have very well dissolved after the demise of the Queen.

The family of Amethu, Neferweben, User and Rekhmire (temp Thutmosis III – Amenhotep II)
Our knowledge of thie family spans four generations and the family includes four viziers (!). Amethu called Ahmose (TT83) was governor of the town and Vizier during the early period of Tuthmosis III. He was married to Ta-Amethu. He had two sons: Neferweben and User(-Amen).

User (TT61 and TT131) was governor of the town and Vizier under Tuthmosis III. He was married to the lady Tuiu. His tomb shows four daughters, mentioning his daughter Ahmose by name, and several sons. I could not find any other names of his sons and daughters.

Neferweben is mentioned in the tomb of his son Rekhmire. Neferweben was Vizier and wab-priest of Amen. Neferweben does not seem to have a tomb in Thebes. The only Neferweben buried in Thebes is a royal butler from the 18th dynasty. Neferweben, son of Amenthu, is mentioned in TT100 (Rekhmire’s tomb) and tomb C15 the tomb of an unnamed overseer of the two houses of gold and silver.

Rekhmire (TT100), son of Neferweben and Bet, was governor of the town and vizier from late Tuthmosis III to Amenhotep II. Rekhmire was married to a lady named Meryt. His tomb shows quite a few sons and daughters. The sons are named Senusert, Mery, Menkheperresonb, Amenhotep, Neferweben, and another son possibly went by the name Baki.

Some of the images of Rekhmire’s sons have been attacked, and it seems that the family lost it’s prominent position at court. The timing here is rather intriguing as there is some evidence of a power struggle at the end of the reign of Amenhotep II.
It may very well be that Rekhmire’s family backed the wrong party in this struggle.


The family of Ahmose called Humay, Sennefer and Amenemopet called Pairy. (Thutmosis III – Amenhotep II)
Ahmose called Humay (TT224) was the son of Senusert and Taidy. Ahmose-Humay was a high ranking official in the administration of the God’s Wife. He was the Overseer of the estates of the God’s Wife and the overseer of the two granaries of the God’s Wife Ahmose-Nefertari. Ahmose –Humay was married to a lady called Nub, who held the title of royal concubine (this may be the same as the title royal ornament, but I’m not sure).
Ahmose Humay and Nub had two sons named Sennefer and Amenemopet Pairy who may both have become so important that they were buried in the King’s Valley.

Sennefer (TT96) was mayor of the Southern City (Thebes) and he was steward of Amenhotep I. (Must be referring to a position in the mortuary temple of Amenhotep I?). He was also chancellor to Amenhotep II, overseer of the granaries of Amen, overseer of the Fields of Amen, High Priest of Amen in Menisut and superintendent of Amen's Gardens.
Sennefer is depicted in his tomb with wive(s) by the name of Sentnay, Sentnefert who were royal nurses and a wife named Meryt. His wive(s) may also include Senetmi and Senetemiah, but these may refer to Sentnay? It is not clear if these are all names referring to one woman, or if Sennefer had multiple wives. Sennefer had at least three daughters and a son (no name given for the son to my knowledge). The daughter most prominently displayed in the tomb is Mut-Tuy. His other daughters are named Mutnefert and Nefertiry. Howard Carter speculated that Sennefer and Sentnay were buried in KV42, based on canopic jars


Amenemopet-Pairy (TT29 and KV48) was married to a lady called Weretmaetef and they had a son called Paser. Amenemopet-Pairy was governor of the town and vizier under Amenhotep II.


The family from Akhmin: Yuya and Tuya, Queen Tiye , Aye and possibly Queen Nefertiti (The Amarna period: Amenhotep III – Aye)
The first members of the family that appear on the scene are Yuya and Tuya (KV46). When Amenhotep III the Magnificent came to the throne as a young boy, he quickly married Tiye, the daughter of Yuya and Tuya. Yuya was a Master of the Horse and High Priest of Min, and thus held high positions in both the army and the priesthood. Yuya and Tuya are known to have had another son named Anen, who became Second Prophet of Amen.

Many assume that Yuya and Tuya were also the parents of Aye. Aye became an important advisor to Akhenaten and later Tutankhamen. Aye took the throne after the death of Tutankhamen. Aye was married to a lady called Tey, who was the wet-nurse to Queen Nefertiti. Some think that Aye may have been the father of Queen Nefertiti, and her sister named Mutnodjemet (who may have later married the Pharaoh Horemheb).

Members of this family remained in important positions until the Ramesside period.


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2005 2:48 pm 
Egyptian Architect
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Well the most important family of them all must be the House of Tao.

Seqenera Tao II
His wife Aahotep
His mother Tetisheri
His son Si-Amon
His son Kamose
Aahmes-Neferteri Wife and sister of Ahmose
And the founder of the New Kingdom Ahmose I (His younger son)

They started the hard and sometime brutal war against the Hyksos
Finally kicking them out of Egypt and re united Egypt as one again.
They paid a big prize in their own blood to do that but they also
founded the greatest Dynasty of them all. Moving the capitol back to Theban and giving Amon back his place in society as the nr one God


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2005 3:49 pm 
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I was talking about non-royal families.

You can't really call the Taosids a power BEHIND the throne as they were firmly planted ON it :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2005 2:51 am 
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You are absolut right but they where not real Kings and Queens at first
and hade to bring the throne back first :wink:


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