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Imhotep
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2005 12:41 pm 
Tomb Robber
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Does anyone know anything about Imhotep?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2005 2:02 pm 
Prince/Princess
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Try google :)

This is a good place to start reading if you know nothing about Imhotep. Touregypt is usually quite reliable:
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/imhotep.htm


Other than that you will need to be more specific with your question :D
Anything specific you want to know about?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 1:02 am 
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This is from here

IMHOTEP "FATHER OF MEDICINE" (2980 B.C.)
Imhotep, called "God of Medicine," "Prince of Peace," and a "Type of Christ." Imhotep was worshipped as a god and healer from approximately 2850 B.C. to 525 B.C., and as a full deity from 525 B.C. to 550 A.D. Even kings and queens bowed at his throne. Imhotep lived during the Third Dynasty at the court of King Zoser. Imhotep was a known scribe, chief lector, priest, architect, astronomer and magician (medicine and magic were used together.) For 3000 years he was worshipped as a god in Greece and Rome. Early Christians worshippd him as the "Prince of Peace."
Imhotep was also a poet and philosopher. He urged contentment and preached cheerfulness. His proverbs contained a "philosophy of life." Imhotep coined the saying "Eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we shall die."

When the Egyptians crossed the Mediterranean, becoming the foundation of the Greek culture, Imhotep's teachings were absorbed there. Yet, as the Greeks were determined to assert that they were the originators of everything, Imhotep was forgotten for thousands of years and a legendary figure, Hippocrates, who came 2000 years after him became known as the Father of Medicine.

It is Imhotep says Sir William Osler, who was the real Father of Medicine. "The first figure of a physician to stand out clearly from the mists of antiquity." Imhotep diagnosed and treated over 200 diseases, 15 diseases of the abdomen, 11 of the bladder, 10 of the rectum, 29 of the eyes, and 18 of the skin, hair, nails and tongue. Imhotep treated tuberculosis, gallstones, appendicitis, gout and arthritis. He also performed surgery and practiced some denistry. Imhotep extracted medicine from plants. He also knew the position and function of the vital organs and circulation of the blood system. The Encyclopedia Britannica says, "The evidence afforded by Egyptian and Greek texts support the view that Imhotep's reputation was very respected in early times...His prestige increased with the lapse of centuries and his temples in Greek times were the centers of medical teachings."

James Henry Breasted says of Imhotep:

In priestly wisdom, in magic, in the formulation of wise proverbs; in medicine and architecture; this remarkable figure of Zoser's reign left so notable a reputation that his name was never forgotten. He was the patron spirit of the later scribes, to whom they regularly poured out a libation from the water-jug of their writing outfit before beginning their work. The people sang of his proverbs centuries later, and 2500 years after his death, he had become a god of medicine in whom Greeks, who call him Imouthes, recognized their own Asklepios. A temple was erected to him near the Serapeum at Memphis, and at the present day, every museum possesses a bronze statue or two of the apotheosized wise man, the proverb maker, physician, and architect of Zoser.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 1:15 am 
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Lostris, the things you write are very interesting! I didn't know a lot about Imhotep, but the fact that he belonged to court of Pharaoh Djoser... thank you!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 2:54 am 
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Hatshepsut76 wrote:
Lostris, the things you write are very interesting! I didn't know a lot about Imhotep, but the fact that he belonged to court of Pharaoh Djoser... thank you!


Oh, thank you very much, but it's not my job! I only copied out of a

website (the link is up there). :P Anyway, thank you in the name of the

webmaster/mistress, hah... :D I try to find interesting articles. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 8:33 am 
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Here's a french article about an inscription about Imhotep.

Summary:
Quote:
LAUER, Jean-Philippe, Remarques concernant l’inscription d’Imhotep gravée sur le socle de statue de l’Horus Neteri-khet (roi Djoser), in: Studies Simpson, 493-498. (fig.).

In the central inscription of Imhotep inscribed on the base of the statue of King Horus Neteri-khet (Djoser) (Cairo JE 49889) the title on the right "King of Lower Egypt, Senwi (or Sensen)" does not refer to Djoser, but to Imhotep. It is an extraordinary qualification of Imhotep in his relation to the king of Lower Egypt; his companion and friend or even (twin) brother or "alter ego." The whole inscription actually concerns Imhotep. It starts with words of the "alter ego" of the King of Lower Egypt to Horus Neteri-khet. On the left, Imhotep’s five major titles are three minor titles are presented. M.W.K.


The actual article can be downloaded from here:
http://www.gizapyramids.org/pdf%20libra ... _lauer.pdf


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 8:43 am 
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okay document downloaded. thank you


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:46 pm 
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what language is this text in? i cannot read it! lol anyone know?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2005 1:14 am 
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The file is written in French


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2005 4:15 am 
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oohh rite.. french.. good if i knew french!!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 5:28 pm 
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The first time I heard about Imhotep was in the movie The Mummy. I think thats how I got hooked on Ancient Egypt.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:14 pm 
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Forget any reference to Imhotep in "The Mummy". 99.9% of what is said about him is untrue.
Actually, he was the innovator of Djoser's Step Pyramid. He was also known as a great healer, know for his medical practices and his dentistry.
The big thing about him now is the effort, through the years, to locate his tomb. The most likely area is somewhere close to the Step Pyramid. When he became known as "the father of medicine, a temple was erected in his honor as a semi-god and then, later, as a god. Many offering have been found on the site of the temple, and popular thought is that his tomb must be close at hand.
Although his titles never included that of visier, he was quite close to the Pharaoh, and his titles were many.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 11:34 am 
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I heard a letter to him was found. The official was saying it was silly for his men to return to base to pick up issues of new clothing / why could the clothes be sent out with the next food delivery.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 11:37 am 
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Imhotep was undoutedly the worst name a screenwriter could have chosen for the archvillain of 'The Mummy'. No translation makes it sound even slightly threatening:

He who comes in peace?
He who comes with offerings?
He who brings satisfaction?

Maybe the second one might work... provided the offerings were horrendous!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:02 am 
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Location: The Valley Of The Kings
Imhotep
Born: c. 3000 b.c.e.
Ankhtowe, Egypt
Died: c. 2950 b.c.e.
Memphis, Egypt
Egyptian magician, physician, scribe, sage, architect, astronomer, vizier, and priest

I mhotep was an ancient Egyptian genius who achieved great success in a wide variety of fields. Inventor of the pyramid, author of ancient wisdom, architect, high priest, physician, astronomer, and writer, Imhotep's many talents and vast acquired knowledge had such an effect on the Egyptian people that he became one of only a handful of individuals of nonroyal birth to be deified, or promoted to the status of a god.

Second in a long line of architects
Imhotep, or "he who cometh in peace," was born in Ankhtowe, a suburb of Memphis, Egypt. The month and day of his birth are noted precisely as the sixteenth day of Epiphi, third month of the Egyptian harvest (corresponding to May 31) but the year is not definitely recorded. It is known that Imhotep was a contemporary (living in the same time period) of the Pharaoh, or king of Egypt, Zoser (also known as Neterikhet) of the Third Dynasty. But estimates of the era of his reign vary by as much as three hundred years, falling between 2980 and 2600 b.c.e.

Imhotep's father, Kanofer, a celebrated architect, was later known to be the first of a long line of master builders who contributed to Egyptian works through the reign of King Darius the First (522–486 b.c.e.). His mother, Khreduonkh, who probably came from the province of Mendes, is known today for having been deified alongside her son, an Egyptian custom.

Vizier under King Zoser
The office of the vizier in politics was literally described as "supervisor of everything in this entire land." Only the best educated citizen could handle the range of duties of this position that worked closely with the Pharaoh, or king of Egypt. As vizier, Imhotep was chief advisor to Zoser in both religious and practical matters, and he controlled the departments of the Judiciary (court system), Treasury, War, Agriculture, and the General Executive.

There are no historical records of Imhotep's acts as a political figure, but his wisdom as a religious advisor was widely recognized after he ended a terrible famine (a severe shortage of food) that dominated Egypt during seven years of Zoser's reign. It is said that the king was failing in his responsibility to please the god Khnum, and his neglect was causing the Nile to fall short of a flood level which would support Egyptian farms. Imhotep, having a vast knowledge of the proper traditions and methods of worship, was able to counsel Zoser on pleasing the god of the cataract (heavy rain), allowing the Nile to return to its usual flood level.

Architect of the famous pyramid at Sakkara
The Step Pyramid at Sakkara is the only of Imhotep's achievements that can still be seen and appreciated today. Its reputation is largely based on Imhotep's accomplishments as the pyramid's inventor and builder. This pyramid was the first structure ever built of cut stone, and is by far the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the World, the seven structures of the ancient world that were astonishing accomplishments for their time. It took twenty years to complete—not very long, given the newness of the idea and the state of structural science in the Bronze Age (between 3000 b.c.e. and 1100 C. E.), the period of development where metals, particularly bronze, were used for the first time.

Imhotep wanted the tomb to accommodate the Pharaoh's rise into the heavens. To do this, he planned to improve upon the flat, rectangular mastabas, or built-in benches, which were the traditional tombal structures. The pyramid was raised on top of the base mastabas in five smaller steps, one on top of the other. He added a passageway on the north side issuing upward within the structure from a sarcophagus chamber (where the stone coffin holding the mummy is kept) seventy-five feet below ground. The total height of the pyramid and base is just under two hundred feet, unimaginably large for a single structure before Imhotep's design.

The project at Sakkara was designed in its entirety as a way for the deceased to perform the rituals of the jubilee festival, or Hebsed. The complex consisted of many other buildings, as well as ornamental posts some thirty-seven feet high. The protection of the king and his burial gifts—about thirty-six thousand vessels (containers) of alabaster, dolomite, aragonite, and other precious materials—was the other primary function of the burial site. The entire complex, about one-quarter by one-half mile in area, was enclosed within a stone wall about thirty-five feet high. Imhotep added several false entrances to throw off possible tomb raiders. As a final measure, the king's treasure was lowered through vertical shafts around the tomb into a long corridor one hundred feet below ground. The digging of just this corridor without machines of any kind is an amazing accomplishment by modern standards.

It is likely that Imhotep was the architect and master builder of many other projects completed during a forty-year period of the Third Dynasty, though none of them compare in size or stylistic influence to the burial site at Sakkara. Imhotep was also the author of an encyclopedia of architecture that was used as a reference tool by Egyptian builders for thousands of years.

Physician-magician, god of medicine
As a god of medicine, Imhotep was beloved as a curer of everyday problems who could "provide remedies for all diseases," and "give sons to the childless." Members of the cult of Imhotep in the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Dynasties (between 525 b.c.e. and 550 C. E.) would pay tribute to the God at his temple just outside Memphis. The temple also contained halls devoted to the teaching of medical methods, and to the preservation of the materia medica, which details the entirety of Egyptian medical knowledge which may actually have originated with Imhotep.

Imhotep's name was often grouped with such powerful deities as Thoth, God of Wisdom, Isis, the wonder-worker, and Ptah, a healer and the ancient God of Memphis. Although other humans were deified by the Egyptians, Imhotep is unique for being known by his own name as a god inferior in power only to Re (chief Sun-God). Imhotep was also a member of the great triad of Memphis, with Ptah, Imhotep's father among the gods, and Sekhmet, a goddess associated with childbirth.

It is a matter of debate today how much of Imhotep's reputation as a curer of disease stems from medical skill and how much comes from his command of magic and healing rituals.


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