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what impact has opening king tuts tomb on today
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tnrees
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There were some late period tombs found at royal tombs found at Tanis (I am at work with no reference books so I can not give details)

The high dam that submerged most of the monuments (which I think should be called the wid dam) was built by the Egyptians with Soviet help and is nothing to do with the British
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Neb-Ma'at-Re
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I may step in here and just say that the title "Father of Modern Egyptology" has been doled out to a number of people including Lepsius, Champollion, Breasted, Carter and most commonly Sir William Mathew Flinders Petrie. One must ask, "by what criteria is this epithet awarded?"

Certainly the work each and every one of these men have contributed to the methods and practices of modern egyptology is invaluable to the science and if it weren't for everyone of them Egyptology would not be what it is today. So to which one of these men is this tilte more deserving? I say none or all! In fact lets add Napolean to the list.

My point is, like the pyramid, Egyptology itself is an evolutionary process. Were it not for the step pyramid, Sneferu's failures (the bent pyramid & the meidum pyramid) and Snefuru's sucesses, Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure would not have perfected their own. And so too the contributions and practices of Napoleon (mainly his interest which sparked a science, not necessarily his practices), Champollion, Lepsius, Breasted,Petrie, Carter have steered the course of Egyptology and what it is today. To exclude the many others, past and present, who have given their life to the science that we love is to do them an injustice, but I mention this group to make a point.

As far as the the disdain that I am reading here for Tutankhamun, the discovery of his tomb, and the public "over-fascination" need I remind everyone what got us all interested in Ancient Egypt to begin with? For me as a child, it was the boy king...the site of that golden mask, his unexplained death, the treasures that filled his tomb, as well as the pyramids in Giza and the mysteries surrounding them. The two most popular and well known things of ancient Egypt. This is what sparked my interest and led me to buy as many books on ancient egypt that I could find. I broadened my knowledge on the whole of the Egyptian civilization and its theocracy. In doing so I was introduced to many individuals that I find far more compelling than Tutankhamun, and many structures that I find more wonderful than the pyramids of Giza. I think anyone who says their interests didn't start in a similar way would be lying.

You see, Tut and the pyramids (as well as Ramses II and Cleopatra) are the doorways to the vast knowledge that is waiting to be learned. If someone shows an interest in any of them, I encourage it in the hopes that one might take it to the next step and learn more about this great civilization.

So the next time you roll your eyes in disgust at the mere mention of King Tut, just remember, there's some kid somewhere picking up a book or watching a TV program and seeing Tutankhamun for the first time. This child may someday grow up to become an egyptologist and make great discoveries and contribuitons to the study of the great ancient civilization that we love so dearly.
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Unas
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, my fascination started with hieroglyphs. I remember the year my class was taught of ancient Egypt, and they did start with Tutankhaten. My first impression of him was, "so what?"... I was actually taken out of class multiple times because I wanted to learn about their language, because well.. it's just so fascinating! At the time, I was in sixth grade, and didn't really comprehend that my teacher was a sixth grade teacher because of the fact that she was more suited as a babysitter with a bad temper. And you call me a liar... Wink
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Neb-Ma'at-Re
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unas wrote:
Well, my fascination started with hieroglyphs. I remember the year my class was taught of ancient Egypt, and they did start with Tutankhaten. My first impression of him was, "so what?"... I was actually taken out of class multiple times because I wanted to learn about their language, because well.. it's just so fascinating! At the time, I was in sixth grade, and didn't really comprehend that my teacher was a sixth grade teacher because of the fact that she was more suited as a babysitter with a bad temper. And you call me a liar... Wink


Well Gregory, babies do need sitters! Just kidding.

You say your fascination was more with the language and hieroglyphs, yet you have not taken up the study of the language seriously. Dont get me wrong Greg, I know you can read some basic inscriptions but you dont study the language. In fact you know much more about Tut than you do hieroglyphs! I think you you secretly love Tutankhamun but made up this story about your fascination about hieroglyphs just to come off as being....different. Cmon admit it, we will still like you...ha.
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bel
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In More to Explore the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information. Special thanks to the Research Division.

At Puruchuco-Huaquerones, an Inca cemetery outside Lima, Peru, a mummy excavation is disturbing Inca spirits—at least according to local villagers. Just over 1,200 families dwell in Tupac Amaru, a shantytown alongside the site, and some blame archaeologists for the recent misfortune that has befallen the town, including the death of a young schoolboy. Digging up these spirits of the past will only harm the living, they argue. Though the chief archaeologist at the site, Guillermo "Willy" Cock, discounts these rumors (he thinks the deceased boy died of tuberculosis), some villagers remain unconvinced.

Willy himself had a fierce cough for months after he began handling the mummies. And when National Geographic photographer Ira Block arrived back home in New York City after completing his assignment for the story, he too had a bacterial cough, which he treated with prescribed medication. Can this be a case of the notorious curse of the mummy—or just bad sanitation?
People have been saying for ages that angry spirits arise from such excavations. The most famous example is the official opening of King Tut's tomb in 1923, after which the financier of the project, as well as some others associated with the discovery, died prematurely. But archaeologists excavating the Inca site in Peru believe the amount of water (60,000 gallons/260,000 liters) and waste dumped by villagers each day causes rampant bacteria to fester in the ground.

Willy isn't spooked. "Not one of us is going to die because of these excavations. We may die because we don't use a mask and have contact with contaminated material." (The team members do use masks when they inspect the mummy bundles in the lab.) "My cough was from the bacteria associated with the mummy bundles and the soil at the site, which is highly contaminated. There's no sewage system in the town, so you can imagine what's in the soil."

Whether it's a poor sewage system or angry spirits affecting those in Tupac Amaru, dedicated archaeologists will continue to seek answers to the extraordinary Inca past.

—Christy Ullrich
Here's the link, if you care to read.
http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0205/feature5/index.html

I personally don't think it's right to desecrete a burial site; but whatever.
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Unas
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know I say I don't like Tut, but he seems to be the most widely known topic, so I brushed up on him a bit so I might have some input in conversation. Like I've said before, I don't mind the man. What I hate about him is what others do with him.. it's just sickening.

And you're right - I haven't studied hieroglyphs seriously. Every time I get into it, I always get sidetracked by things like reading on various aspects of Egyptology, Astronomy, etc., or playing the guitar, cooking, etc. etc. etc... I do enjoy learning the language dearly, but it's slow going as I guess that honestly, I lack the patients!! Embarassed
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Bastet_Joyce
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now this is what I was referring to when I said "I enjoy a lively debate." We all have different aspects of Egypt's rich past that we enjoy studying and talking about. For some, it's a facination with Tutankhamen..with others, it's the language but we all need to remember that healthy discussion and debate isn't angry or malicious in nature.

Unas, thank you for reminding me of some of the many people, both men and women who have contributed to our knowledge of Egypt. You are right that there are many who have...and continue to do so.

In all actuality, I thought only Psusennes I and I were still interested in talking about "good ole Tut"....lol Boy was I wrong.

Also, I freely admit that the first thing I ever read about Egypt started with King Tut's tomb, although that wasn't the main gist of the book. Lordy, that was sooooooooo many years ago....back in the middle 60's.
Yes, I'm an old person...lol Please don't hold that against me.
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Bastet_Joyce
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops...not Unas....Neb ....I thank you for your poking me when I needed it. Embarassed
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Unas
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Location: Saqqara... someday...

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was wondering what I said about that!

Anyhoo, for Psusennes I to say that there are no more 'proper' Egyptologists... How do you come to this conclusion? What is your idea of the proper Egyptologist? I've always imagined old Egyptologists as people with a curiosity and a grant from some rich dentist who wants to add to his collection, which I never saw as 'proper', but rather, contractioral ...I think I made that word up, but I hope you know what I mean..!

I don't think it's fair to dismiss the contribution that today's Egyptologists; people like Kent Weeks, Ian Shaw or even (yes, I'm going to say it!) Zahi Hawass. These people and countless others work tirelessly for a love of the culture at a level I believe greater than that of the interest introduced before the discoveries of Seti I and Tutankhaten. The reason new discoveries aren't nearly as well known as the finding of the boy king is that so many Egyptologists tend to keep on finding 'the oldest', 'the richest', and 'the greatest', and the world just doesn't care any more.
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bel
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2006 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay you guy's King Tut it is:
Talk aboiut desecration of a tomb.....
Jezz Louiz


King Tut's Underwear to Tour US
Written by Glyphdoctor


King Tut's underwear on display in the Egyptian Museum
The underwear once worn by the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun is the centerpiece of a new touring exhibition entitled “Tutankhamun and the Golden Ass of the Pharaohs.” After a successful run in Europe, where it was entitled “Tutankhamun: the Golden Behind,” the exhibition will be visiting Los Angeles, Chicago, Fort Lauderdale, and Philadelphia starting next month.

In order to learn more about the king’s life, Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) has conducted a DNA test on the underwear. “The ancient Egyptians invented the DNA sample,” says director general of the SCA, Zahi Hawass. “Before Monica Lewinsky’s blue dress, and even before OJ Simpson’s gloves, there was Tut’s underwear.” Tests were done on the underwear to identify any semen present. On a program detailing the study on National Geographic Television last week, Hawass proudly announced, “The results of the semen test were positive, proving that Tut was not simply a boy king, but a real man.”

Other Egyptologists disagreed with Hawass, however, noting that the removal of Tut’s underwear for the DNA test revealed that his penis is now missing. A dissenting Egyptologist, who preferred to remain anonymous for fear he might not be allowed to work in Egypt again for expressing his opinion, exclaimed “How on earth can you call this mummy that of a man, let alone a king, when the crown jewels are missing?”

However, this small detail seems to have been overlooked by the Hanes Corporation, which is currently in negotiation with Hawass for the rights to market a replica of the underwear. It is rumored that Steve Martin, familiar to most Americans for his Tut skit on Saturday Night Live in the 1970s, will be hired as the model for the advertising campaign.

Not everyone was pleased with this baring of Tut’s secrets. A descendent of Tutankhamun from Luxor, Egypt, Hassan Hamdi Hussein, was vehemently opposed to the exposure of the king’s underwear on television, and in the upcoming exhibition. Taking a cue from Saddam Hussein’s lawyer, he is suing National Geographic Television for the broadcast, claiming it is a violation of his ancestor’s privacy. He has also demanded that President Hosni Mubarak launch an inquiry into the affair by detaining Hawass, his family, and all the residents of his neighborhood for questioning under Egypt’s emergency law.
Who would have ever thought it?
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Bastet_Joyce
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2006 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Makes you wonder about the sanity of some people. Tut's descendant?? I really don't think so. As I understand it, his only possible offspring were both buried in Tut's tomb with him. (i.e. the two fetuses found in coffinettes in Tut's tomb). Anyway, how could this Hamdi character POSSIBLY be able to trace his ancestory back that far, even if he WAS possibly Tut's descendant??? IMHO, this dude is certifiably insane.

I'll come down off my soapbox now....sorry about the rant.

Joyce
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